February 10, 2019, Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Feb06

February 10, 2019, Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

“My dear brothers and sisters in Christ, It is with deep humility and gratitude to you, the people of the Diocese of Gallup that I announce the theme of our 2019 Bishop’s Annual Appeal: “Be Trustworthy Stewards”. The Catholic Church in the United States, as well as world-wide, is experiencing much pain and anger over the recent revelations of abuse on the part of some of the hierarchy. These actions are inexcusable, and call for repentance and renewal throughout the Church. I’d like to invite you to join me in these actions so that the Kingdom of God might be made known throughout our diocese and the world. I would like to invite you to prayerfully consider a contribution to the Annual Bishop’s Appeal. This year’s theme “Trustworthy Stewardship”, which is taken from 1 Corinthians 4: 1-2,5: “thus one should regard us: as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God. Now it is of course required of stewards that they be found trustworthy…the Lord will bring to light what is hidden in darkness and will manifest the motives of our hearts.” When you consider a contribution to the Appeal, think of the message and example of Christ, who came to serve, and not to be served. My desire is to use your contributions in a trustworthy manner, to serve the least of these as Christ commands us (MT 25:40). Barring the small cost of producing these Appeal materials, all of your contributions help the ministries of the Diocese of Gallup. These ministries serve those who, here and now, every day, have great need. Priests and sisters throughout the Diocese, who tirelessly serve our communities, rely on funds from the Appeal for food, clothing, and living expenses. The homeless, poor, and needy people of our communities, regardless of religious background, visit our Catholic Charities agencies for emergency shelter, food, and housing help. Our Catholic schools, which educate and evangelize entire communities, require aid for supplies, maintenance and utilities. All these, and many more receive the benefit of your generous prayers and contributions. I ask you to consider these, your neighbors, during this introductory Appeal season, and I ask that you pray for me, that I be a faithful steward of your gifts. One day I must face God in judgment, as will we all, and I will answer for how I have acted as a shepherd for the souls in my care. For as the Gospel reminds us, “there is nothing done in darkness that will not be brought to light.” (Luke 8:17) I remain yours in the living Christ   Bishop James S....

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February 3, 2019, Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle C
Jan31

February 3, 2019, Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle C

All of us are called to exercise the corporal and spiritual works of mercy. Here is a little memory device that we can use by looking around the inside of the Cathedral church to remind us of the Spiritual works of mercy. Recalling the 7 Spiritual Works of Mercy   A method of learning and then remembering the 7 spiritual works of mercy. Instructing the ignorant Stained glass windows Studying the stained glass we are instructed about many things in the life of Christ and the teachings and history of the Church. One of ours at the Cathedral shows Jesus teaching the little children. Counseling the doubtful Image of Our Lady Beholding Our Lady’s image brings to mind her title, Our Lady of Good Counsel. When the servants at the wedding feast of Cana didn’t know what to do, she counseled them, “do whatever He (Jesus) tells you”. Comforting the sorrowful Image of Our Lord Look at the image of Our Lord who said, “come unto me all you who are heavily burdened and I will give you rest.” Reproving the sinner Pulpit See and hear the priest exhorting us to “turn away from sin and believe in the gospel.” St. John Vianney was said to be as ferocious as lion in the pulpit to bring sinners to repentance, but as gentle as a lamb as their confessor. Forgiving injuries Confessional When we see the confessional occupied by a priest, it calls us to come and seek forgiveness. “Whose sins you forgive are forgiven them.” Bearing wrongs patiently Stations of the Cross Upon seeing what Our Lord endured in carrying the cross, we are astonished and inspired by His patience in bearing wrongs. Praying for the living and the dead Votive candles The bright flame that consumes the candle is a symbol of our intense prayer for the living and the dead....

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Sunday School, Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle C
Jan31

Sunday School, Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle C

Sunday School To View or Print the Sunday School page, click on the link below:   Sunday School, Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle C...

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January 27, 2019, Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle C
Jan23

January 27, 2019, Third Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle C

How do we know what God wants us to do? Here’s a little lesson from the Catechism of the Catholic Church to help us understand how to seek God’s Will and try to accomplish it. Discernment of God’s Will and Abandonment to God’s Will.  The Catechism of the Catholic Church on discernment and the Will of God. 2826 By prayer we can discern “what is the will of God” and obtain the endurance to do it. Jesus teaches us that one enters the kingdom of heaven not by speaking words, but by doing “the will of my Father in heaven.” 1835 Prudence disposes the practical reason to discern, in every circumstance, our true good and to choose the right means for achieving it. 2706 To meditate on what we read helps us to make it our own by confronting it with ourselves. Here, another book is opened: the book of life. We pass from thoughts to reality. To the extent that we are humble and faithful, we discover in meditation the movements that stir the heart and we are able to discern them. It is a question of acting truthfully in order to come into the light: “Lord, what do you want me to do?” 2677 Holy Mary, Mother of God: With Elizabeth we marvel, “And why is this granted me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?” Because she gives us Jesus, her son, Mary is Mother of God and our mother; we can entrust all our cares and petitions to her: she prays for us as she prayed for herself: “Let it be to me according to your word.” By entrusting ourselves to her prayer, we abandon ourselves to the will of God together with her: “Thy will be done.” Helps to discernment: Looking for God’s Will in the needs of our neighbors Looking for God’s Will in the needs of the Church Looking for God’s Will in our current obligations Looking for God’s Will in His expressed Commands Looking for God’s Will through the events that He permits to occur for the greater good. Asking in a given situation what would seem to be more pleasing to God. Helps to abandonment: Desiring to do God’s Will in all things big and small Accepting that God’s Will  may not be to our liking Loving God’s Will even when we don’t understand it Believing Jesus’ words that only the one who does the Will of His Father will enter the Kingdom. Promptly and cheerfully doing what we know to be God’s Will. Pitfalls which keep us from abandonment: Wanting to serve God on our own terms Attachment to sin, worldly...

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Sunday School, Second Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle C
Jan16

Sunday School, Second Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle C

Sunday School To view or print the Sunday School page, click on the link below:   Sunday School, Second Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle...

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