April 21, 2019, Easter Sunday of the Resurrection of the Lord, Cycle C
Apr15

April 21, 2019, Easter Sunday of the Resurrection of the Lord, Cycle C

Every year we train our children who are preparing for the Sacraments the names and purpose of all the parts of the Mass. We also have adults who are preparing to enter the Church at Easter who are becoming accustomed to our way of Worshiping God in the Mass.  All of us need an occasional refresher on the meaning, names, and purposes of the Mass so that we may participate more fully. Part of the great genius of the Roman Rite of Mass is that it has a beauty that comes about from order.  All of its parts are distributed among the people and ministers in a way are reflective of the Body of Christ. As the Holy Spirit inspired St. Paul to describe the Church, each member has its own function, and each part works together with the other members of the body so that it may be a perfect unity.  Accordingly, when the Church worships God, the textual parts of the Mass are distributed among the priest, deacon, cantor, choir, and faithful so that each is responsible to sing or say their own part. The Order of Mass contains all the dialogs between the priest and the people.  These dialogs are distributed throughout the Mass; all of them may be sung or spoken -The Sign of the Cross, which the priest says, and to which the people respond, “Amen”. -The Opening dialog, when the priest says “The Lord be with you” and the people respond “And with your Spirit”. -The Offertory dialog, “Pray brethren that my sacrifice and yours….  “May the Lord accept the sacrifice at your hands…” -The Preface dialog “lift up your hearts”, “We lift them up to the Lord.”  and etc. -The embolism dialog after the Our Father, “Deliver us Lord…”For the Kingdom the power…” -The invitation to the Sign of Peace.  “The peace of the Lord be with you always…”  “And with your spirit.” -The dialog before Communion, “Behold the Lamb of God… “Lord I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof…” The Ordinary of the Mass, likewise is sung or said by the people and the priest together.  The Ordinary of Mass is unchanging, and it includes the following prayers and invocations which may be sung by the people with the support of the choir, and occasionally sung on their behalf by the choir. -The Kyrie Eleison (Lord have mercy) -The Gloria (Glory to God in the Highest) -The Creed -The Sanctus (Holy, Holy, Holy) -The Our Father The Instructions belong to the deacon, or if there is no deacon the priest gives them. -The invitation to give the...

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April 14, 2019, Palm Sunday of the Passion of the Lord
Apr09

April 14, 2019, Palm Sunday of the Passion of the Lord

(Continuation) Confirmation RCIA Catechumenate Worksheet  Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC)#1210-1321. United States Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapters 15, 16 Confirmation gives us the grace to be adult Christians. It’s essential rite includes (CCC#1293-130: A.Renewal of _Baptismal_ Promises (when split with Baptism); The Laying on of  _Hands_; _Anointing_ with Chrism Oil. The effects of Confirmation include (CCC#1302-1305): Deeper rooting as God’s _Children_; Firmer union with _Christ_ Increase in the _Gifts_ of the Holy Spirit: Fear of the Lord (wonder and awe); Knowledge; Piety (reverence); Fortitude (Courage); Counsel (Right Judgment); Understanding; Wisdom; More perfect bond with the _Church_; Strength to _Spread_ and _Defend_ the Faith. Only those baptized can receive Confirmation (CCC#1306-1314). It is celebrated only _Once_ in the life of the Christian; For those receiving it after the age of reason, one must: _Profess_ the Faith; Be in the state of _Grace_; Have the _Intention_ of receiving it; Be ready to be Christ’s _Disciple_ and _Witness_. The ordinary minister of the sacrament is the _Bishop_, but it can be administered by a Priest....

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April 7, 2019, Fifth Sunday of Lent
Apr03

April 7, 2019, Fifth Sunday of Lent

Baptism Worksheet Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC)#1210-1321. United States Catholic Catechism for Adults Chapters 15, 16  From the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Baptism is an immersing that makes us God’s children (CCC#1214-1216).  The essential rite of Baptism includes (CCC#1239): Triple immersion or pouring water over head; Trinitarian Formula; Anointing with sacred Chrism (Infant Baptism); Only those not yet baptized can be baptized (CCC#1246-1255). Adults are prepared for Baptism through participation in the Catechumenate; Because of God’s gratuitous grace, infants can receive Baptism; The ordinary minister of Baptism are Bishops, Priests and Deacons; Anyone can baptize in case of necessity. Baptism is necessary for salvation (CCC#1257-1261). It is the only way known to the Church; God is not bound by this Sacrament; Baptism by blood or desire also saves; We can be saved without baptism only if we are ignorant; Children who die without Baptism are entrusted to God’s mercy. The effects of baptism are (CCC#1262-1274): Purification from all sins including; Personal (actual) sins; Original Sin; The consequences of (punishment for) sin; The remaining of some results of Original Sin: Suffering and frailties; Illness; Death; Concupiscence – the attraction to sin. New birth in the Holy Spirit: Child of God (New Creature); Theological virtues of faith, hope, and love; The Gift of the Holy Spirit; Membership in Christ’s body; Share in the Priestly, prophetic and royal mission Christ; The ability to worship God....

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Fourth Sunday of Lent, March 31, 2019
Mar27

Fourth Sunday of Lent, March 31, 2019

Adapted from an article by Scott P. Richert Laetare Sunday Most Catholic people in the U.S. are used to Mass being conducted in English (or their native language) and rarely think about the fact that Latin remains the official language of the Catholic Church. But occasionally, Latin terms sneak back in as in the case of Laetare Sunday, the fourth Sunday of Lent. The date is moveable as it is dependent on the date of Easter, which changes annually based on lunar activity. What Does Laetare Mean? Laetare means “Rejoice” in Latin. The 40 days of Lent are a time for solemnity according to Roman Catholic doctrine, so how is it possible to celebrate during a time for meditative reflection? Quite simply, the church recognized that people need a break from sorrow. The fourth Sunday was considered a day of relaxation from the normal rigors of Lent. It was a day of hope with Easter within sight. Religious Doctrine and Biblical Reference During Mass with the short introit chant at the entrance is from Isaiah 66:10-11, which begins Laetare, Jerusalem, which means “Rejoice, O Jerusalem.”  Because the midpoint of Lent is the Thursday of the third week of Lent, Laetare Sunday has traditionally been viewed as a day of celebration, on which the austerity of Lent is briefly lessened. The passage from Isaiah continues, “Rejoice with joy, you that have been in sorrow,” and on Laetare Sunday, the purple vestments and altar cloths of Lent are set aside, and rose ones are used instead. Flowers, which are normally forbidden during Lent, may be placed on the altar. Traditionally, the organ was never played during Lent, except on Laetare Sunday. Other Names for Laetare Sunday Laetare Sunday is also known as Rose Sunday, Refreshment Sunday, or Mothering Sunday. Historically, servants were released from service for the day to visit their mothers, hence the term “Mothering Sunday.”  Laetare Sunday has a counterpart in Advent season or the Christmas season in preparation of the birth of Jesus. Gaudete Sunday is the third Sunday of Advent when purple vestments are exchanged for rose ones. The point of both days is to provide you with encouragement as you progress toward the end of each respective penitential season. Other Traditions during Lent Lent is a moveable date dependent on Easter. Lent traditionally starts 40 days before Easter and gets calculated prior to Easter, and usually does not include Sundays. Usually, Roman Catholics do not sing the Alleluia song during Lent. This song of praise and great joy is replaced with a more penitent phrase such as, “Glory and Praise to You, Lord Jesus Christ.”  During...

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Third Sunday of Lent, March 24, 2019
Mar27

Third Sunday of Lent, March 24, 2019

Please reach out to friends who may have an interest in the Catholic faith, Lent is a great time to share the Faith and to evangelize. RCIA What are the steps of RCIA? Prior to beginning the RCIA process, an individual comes to some knowledge of Jesus Christ, considers his or her relationship with Jesus Christ and is usually attracted in some way to the Catholic Church. This period is known as the Period of Evangelization and Pre-catechumenate which we also call the period of Inquiry. For some, this process involves a long period of searching; for others, a shorter time. Often, contact with people of faith and a personal faith experience lead people to inquire about the Catholic Church. After a conversation with a priest, or RCIA director, the person, known as an “inquirer,” may seek acceptance into the Order of Catechumens, through the Rite of Acceptance. During this Rite, the inquirer stands amidst the parish community and states that he or she wants to become a baptized member of the Catholic Church. The parish assembly affirms this desire and the inquirer becomes a Catechumen. The Period of the Catechumenate can last for as long as several years or for a shorter time. It depends on how the person is growing in faith, what questions they encounter along the way, and how God leads them on this journey. During this time, the Catechumens consider what God is saying to them in the Scriptures, what changes in their life they need to make to respond to God’s inspiration, and what Baptism in the Catholic Church means. When a Catechumen and the priest and the parish team working with him or her believes the person is ready to make a faith commitment to Jesus in the Catholic Church, the next step is the request for baptism and the celebration of the Rite of Election. Even before the Catechumens are baptized, they have a special relationship to the Church. The Rite of Election includes the enrollment of names of all the Catechumens seeking baptism at the coming Easter Vigil. Typically, on the first Sunday of Lent, the Catechumens, their sponsors and families gather at the cathedral church. The Catechumens publicly express their desire for baptism to the diocesan bishop. Their names are recorded in a book and they are called the Elect. The days of Lent are the final Period of Purification and Enlightenment leading up to the Easter Vigil. Lent is a period of preparation marked by prayer, study, and spiritual direction for the Elect, and prayers for them by the parish communities. The Celebration of the Sacraments of Initiation takes place during the Easter Vigil Liturgy on Holy Saturday when the Elect receives the sacraments of...

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Second Sunday in Lent, March 24, 2019, Cycle C
Mar20

Second Sunday in Lent, March 24, 2019, Cycle C

Please reach out to friends who may have an interest in the Catholic faith, Lent is a great time to share the Faith and to evangelize. RCIA What are the steps of RCIA? Prior to beginning the RCIA process, an individual comes to some knowledge of Jesus Christ, considers his or her relationship with Jesus Christ and is usually attracted in some way to the Catholic Church. This period is known as the Period of Evangelization and Pre-catechumenate which we also call the period of Inquiry. For some, this process involves a long period of searching; for others, a shorter time. Often, contact with people of faith and a personal faith experience lead people to inquire about the Catholic Church. After a conversation with a priest, or RCIA director, the person, known as an “inquirer,” may seek acceptance into the Order of Catechumens, through the Rite of Acceptance. During this Rite, the inquirer stands amidst the parish community and states that he or she wants to become a baptized member of the Catholic Church. The parish assembly affirms this desire and the inquirer becomes a Catechumen. The Period of the Catechumenate can last for as long as several years or for a shorter time. It depends on how the person is growing in faith, what questions they encounter along the way, and how God leads them on this journey. During this time, the Catechumens consider what God is saying to them in the Scriptures, what changes in their life they need to make to respond to God’s inspiration, and what Baptism in the Catholic Church means. When a Catechumen and the priest and the parish team working with him or her believes the person is ready to make a faith commitment to Jesus in the Catholic Church, the next step is the request for baptism and the celebration of the Rite of Election. Even before the Catechumens are baptized, they have a special relationship to the Church. The Rite of Election includes the enrollment of names of all the Catechumens seeking baptism at the coming Easter Vigil. Typically, on the first Sunday of Lent, the Catechumens, their sponsors and families gather at the cathedral church. The Catechumens publicly express their desire for baptism to the diocesan bishop. Their names are recorded in a book and they are called the Elect. The days of Lent are the final Period of Purification and Enlightenment leading up to the Easter Vigil. Lent is a period of preparation marked by prayer, study, and spiritual direction for the Elect, and prayers for them by the parish communities. The Celebration of the Sacraments of Initiation takes place during the Easter Vigil Liturgy on Holy Saturday when the Elect receives the sacraments of...

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Second Sunday of Lent, March 17, 2019
Mar13

Second Sunday of Lent, March 17, 2019

ANOINTING OF THE SICK We will be having a communal celebration of the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick at the Family Center at 11 am on Saturday March 23rd for all the elderly sick, chronically sick, and all those whose illness is beginning to place them in even remote danger. This time of Lent will also be a good time to call the parish to arrange for a priest to visit the homebound who would like to have the opportunity for Confession and Anointing of the Sick. The Sacrament of the Anointing of Sick was established by Christ. The Gospel of Mark, referring to the apostles, relates that Jesus sent them out “…and they anointed with oil many who were sick and cured them.” -Mk 6:12-13.  In the Epistle of James, one of those apostles, we hear a more explicit description of the Sacrament.  “Is anyone among you sick? He should summon the presbyters of the church, and they should pray over him and anoint him with oil in the name of the Lord, and the prayer of faith will save the sick person, and the Lord will raise him up.  If he has committed any sins, he will be forgiven.”  -James 5:14 Recently Pope Francis gave a Catechesis on this Sacrament. “In our catechesis on the sacraments, we now turn to the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick, which expresses God’s merciful presence to the sick, the suffering and the aged. The parable of the Good Samaritan reflects our Lord’s tender concern for those who suffer; like the Samaritan, and following Christ’s example and teaching, the Church brings God’s healing presence to the suffering through the sacramental sign of anointing with oil. As we learn from the Letter of James (5:14-15), the early Church continued his ministry to the sick through prayer and anointing by her presbyters. Through the celebration of the Anointing of the Sick, the Church accompanies us in facing the profound mystery of suffering and death. In a culture which all too often refuses to speak of these realities, we need all the more to recognize the beauty of this Sacrament and to appreciate, in spiritual solidarity with the whole Church, the presence of the Lord Jesus, who strengthens us in faith and hope, and reminds us that nothing – not even evil and death – can ever separate us from the saving power of his love.”...

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