From the Rector: Indulgences for the Holy Souls in Purgatory
Nov16

From the Rector: Indulgences for the Holy Souls in Purgatory

Indulgences for the Holy Souls in Purgatory An indulgence can either be partial or plenary. It is partial if it removes only part of the temporal punishment due to sin, or plenary if it removes all punishment. To be able to gain an indulgence, one must have the intention to gain them, and perform the works at the time and in the manner prescribed. The traditional conditions to attain a Plenary Indulgence: A Plenary Indulgence can be gained only one per day. The faithful must be in the state of grace and these three conditions must accompany the prescribed act: -the faithful must receive the sacrament of confession, either eight days before or after the pious act is performed, -receive Holy Communion on that day -and recite prayers for the intentions of the Holy Father (one Our Father and one Hail Mary is the minimum, but any other additional prayers may be added). All attachment to sin, even venial sin, must be absent. If one’s disposition is less than perfect or if some of the above conditions are not fulfilled, the indulgence becomes partial. In the Year 2000 Jubilee Year the Apostolic Penitentiary relaxed the conditions for confession and communion: In order to obtain a plenary indulgence (only one per day), the faithful must, in addition to being in the state of grace: -have the interior disposition of complete detachment from sin, even venial sin; — have sacramentally confessed their sins; -receive the Holy Eucharist (it is certainly better to receive it while participating in Holy Mass, but for the indulgence only Holy Communion is required); -pray for the intentions of the Supreme Pontiff. -It is appropriate, but not necessary, that the sacramental Confession and especially Holy Communion and the prayer for the Pope’s intentions take place on the same day that the indulgenced work is performed; but it is sufficient that these sacred rites and prayers be carried out within several days (about 20) before or after the indulgenced act. Prayer for the Pope’s intentions is left to the choice of the faithful, but an “Our Father” and a “Hail Mary” are suggested. One sacramental Confession suffices for several plenary indulgences, but a separate Holy Communion and a separate prayer for the Holy Father’s intentions are required for each plenary indulgence. Although this was given for the Jubilee Year, these “remain in effect, since it was contained under the “General remarks on indulgences,” and not under those specific to the Jubilee Indulgence.” See Indulgences – General Conditions for further explanation. Indulgenced Acts for the Poor Souls: A partial indulgence can be obtained by devoutly visiting a cemetery and praying for the departed,...

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From the Rector: Indulgences for the Holy Souls in Purgatory
Nov09

From the Rector: Indulgences for the Holy Souls in Purgatory

Indulgences for the Holy Souls in Purgatory It is during November that the Church meditates on the Communion of Saints, which is the charitable link with the faithful who have already reached heaven (Church Triumphant), the faithful departed who are still expiating their sins in Purgatory (Church Suffering) and of the pilgrim faithful here on earth (Church Militant). “In this wonderful exchange, the holiness of one profits others, well beyond the harm that the sin of one could cause others. Thus recourse to the communion of saints lets the contrite sinner be more promptly and efficaciously purified of the punishments for sin.” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1475). On November 1st the Church celebrates the Solemnity of All Saints, a Holy Day of Obligation, honoring all those faithful in heaven. Throughout November the Church also remembers our Faithful Departed. The need and duty of prayer for the departed souls has been acknowledged by the Church at all times. It is recommended in the Scriptures of the Old Testament: “It is therefore a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may be loosed from sins.”(2 Macch. 12, 46). This duty has found expression not only in public and private prayers but especially in the offering of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass for the repose of souls. Throughout November the Church prays for all who are in the purifying fires of Purgatory, waiting for the day when they will join the company of the saints in heaven. The celebration of Mass is the highest means the Church can provide for charity for the dead, but we can also relieve their sufferings through our prayers, sufferings and penances. We can also help the Poor Souls by doing acts and prayers that have indulgences attached to them. There are many indulgences, applicable only to the Souls in Purgatory, that can be obtained during the month of November. An indulgence is “the remission before God of the temporal punishment due for sins already forgiven as far as their guilt is concerned.” To obtain this remission there are proper dispositions and certain conditions predetermined by the Church that must be met by the faithful. The remission is acquired through the intervention of the Church, who has the power to loose and bind granted through Jesus Christ. “As minister of the Redemption, authoritatively dispenses and applies the treasury of the satisfaction won by Christ and the Saints” (Enchiridion of Indulgences). To understand this practice of indulgences, the Catechism explains: It is necessary to understand that sin has a double consequence. Grave sin deprives us of communion with God and therefore makes us incapable of...

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From the Rector: Bazaar!!
Nov03

From the Rector: Bazaar!!

  Sacred Heart Cathedral 105th Annual Bazaar Sunday—November 5, 2017 12:00 p.m.—4:00 p.m. Sacred Heart School Gymnasium Raffle Grand Prize: $1,000.00 tickets on sale at the bazaar We will have: Entertainment (Filipino Community Group, Gallup Bengals Dance Team, Starletts, Dylan Vargas Karate, Gemz Dance Team, and the Gallup Bengals Cheer Team) Game Booths for Children and Adults Baked Goods Silent Auction Cake Walk Linen Booth Food Booths (Turkey Dinner, Mexican Food, Filipino Food and Snack Bar) Christmas Booth You will not want to miss out on our delicious Turkey Dinner with all the trimmings.  The dinner will be held at the Sacred Heart School Cafeteria beginning at 12:00 p.m. and continuing until it is all gone. Come and join the family fun and support the Cathedral Parish and Sacred Heart School this Sunday. Thank you to all who have dedicated so much time, effort,  and material goods to make this year’s Bazaar a success!  The meal will be great, and the booths, entertainment  and fellowship will be a blast!  See you there! A special Thank you to Louie & Diane Bonaguidi, Patty Lundstrom & Ron Berg and all those you helped with the Bazaar breakfast/lunch last weekend!! -Fr. Keller...

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From the Rector: All Saints Day and All Souls Day
Oct26

From the Rector: All Saints Day and All Souls Day

All Saints Day and All Souls Day All Saints’ Day (also known as All Hallows’ Day or Hallowmas) is the day after All Hallows’ Eve (Hallowe’en). It is a feast day celebrated on 1st November by Anglicans and Roman Catholics. It is an opportunity for believers to remember all saints and martyrs, known and unknown, throughout Christian history. As part of this day of obligation, believers are required to attend church and try not to do any servile work. Remembering saints and martyrs and dedicating a specific day to them each year has been a Christian tradition since the 4th century AD, but it wasn’t until 609AD that Pope Boniface IV decided to remember all martyrs. Originally 13th May was designated as the Feast of All Holy Martyrs. Later, in 837AD, Pope Gregory IV extended the festival to remember all the saints, changed its name to Feast of All Saints and changed the date to 1st November. The primary reason for establishing a common feast day was because of the desire to honor the great number of martyrs, especially during the persecution of Emperor Diocletion (284-305), the worst and most extensive of the persecutions. Quite simply, there were not enough days of the year for a feast day for each martyr and many of them died in groups. A common feast day for all saints, therefore seemed most appropriate. Along with the Feast of All Saints developed the Feast of All Souls. The Church has consistently encouraged the offering of prayers and Mass for the souls of the faithful departed in Purgatory. At the time of their death, these souls are not perfectly cleansed of venial sin or have not atoned for past transgressions, and thereby are deprived of the Beatific Vision. The faithful on earth can assist these souls in Purgatory in attaining the Beatific Vision through their prayers, good works and the offering of Mass. All Souls’ Day is marked on 2nd November (or the 3rd if the 2nd is a Sunday), directly following All Saints’ Day. Other rituals include the offering of Requiem Mass for the dead, visiting family graves and reflecting on lost loved ones. In Mexico, on el dia de los muertos (Day of the Dead), people take picnics to their family graves and leave food out for their dead relatives. Whilst praying for the dead is an ancient Christian tradition, it was Odilo, Abbot of Cluny (France) who, in 998AD, designated a specific day for remembering and praying for those in the process of purification. This started as a local feast in his monasteries and gradually spread throughout the Catholic Church towards the end of the 10th century AD. While All...

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From the Rector: Divine Revelation
Oct20

From the Rector: Divine Revelation

This is a portion of the lesson we give to our RCIA class on Divine Revelation. It’s a great refresher for every Catholic to study.   God’s desire to communicate with us comes from His burning love for us (CCC#50).  The two ways of knowing about God are through:    Human _Reason_ : That which we know about God on our own power;    Divine _Revelation_ : That which we know about God only by His assistance.   Revelation is God’s free choice to share His life with us (CCC#50). Revelation: _Supernaturally_ makes up for what reason lacks – Intimacy with God; Moves us past knowing about God and invites us into to a _Relationship_ with Him; Reveals God’s _Mystery_, His plan of loving goodness.   The purpose of God’s plan is to save us, to bring us to heaven (CCC#51-53). God’s revelation helps us make a response to love Him _Beyond_ our own ability. Revelation includes God’s saving _Words_ and _Deeds_ in history. Revelation culminates in the Person and mission of _Jesus_; There is no further revelation after the death of the last _Apostle_.     Christ communicated His plan of salvation to the Apostles through (CCC#75-79; 84-87): Scripture, the _Speech_ of God, written under the _Inspiration_ of the Holy Spirit; Tradition, the living transmission of the Gospel, includes: _Doctrine_ (beliefs); _Sacraments_ (worship); _Morality_; _Prayer_. The gift of teaching authority (the _Magisterium_), given to the Apostles and their successors.   The Catholic Understanding of Divine Revelation   Scripture Tradition Magisterium     Authors God Human Writers Old Testament: Jewish People New Testament: The Apostles Christ The Apostles The Apostles’ Successors (Pope and Bishops) Christ and the Holy Spirit     Foundational  Scripture Verses 2 Timothy 3:16   “All scripture is inspired by God and is useful for teaching, for refutation, for correction, and for training in righteousness,” 2 Thessalonians 2:15   “Therefore, brothers, stand firm and hold fast to the traditions that you were taught, either by an oral statement or by a letter of ours.” Matthew 28:18-20   “18. Then Jesus approached and said to them, “All power in heaven and on earth has been given to me.19.Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, 20. teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age.”   Includes   Old Testaments – People of Israel New Testament – Christ and the Church   Doctrine (see Catechism) Sacraments Morality Prayer     The Gift of Doctrinal Interpretation   Given To The Church The Church The...

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From the Rector: Funerals-Part III
Oct06

From the Rector: Funerals-Part III

Funerals: Part III of the Series The Order of Christian Funerals is the book which contains all the prayers, rituals, readings, and instructions approved for use in the Dioceses of the United States for carrying out Catholic Funeral Rites.  As mentioned in the first Part of this series, there are three Major parts of the Funeral Rites. 1.) Vigil for the deceased, 2.) The Funeral Liturgy itself, (Mass) and 3.) the Rite of Committal. The Vigil.   The Vigil and Related Rites and Prayers include the rites that may be celebrated between the time of death and the funeral liturgy.  The Vigil is the principal celebration of the Christian community during the time before the funeral liturgy.  It may take the form of a liturgy of the Word or of some part of the Office for the Dead (the Liturgy of the Hours). Two vigil services are provided in the Ritual book, the Vigil for the Deceased, and the Vigil for the deceased with Reception (of the body) at the Church. The Vigil may be celebrated in the home of the deceased, in the funeral home chapel, or some other suitable place.  It may also be celebrated in the Church, but at a time well before the funeral liturgy, so that the funeral liturgy will not be too lengthy. The Vigil in the form of the Liturgy of the Word consists of the introductory rites, the readings, the prayer of intercession, the Lord’s prayer and a concluding rite.  At the vigil, a member of the family or a friend of the deceased may speak in remembrance of the deceased.  Also, at the Vigil sacred songs appropriate to the occasion may be sung as an entrance and at the closing. Music for Catholic worship should always originate from the voices of the actual participants, and not the playing of recorded sound, while recordings that are especially meaningful to the family may of course be used outside the liturgy itself at public receptions or private gatherings of the family and friends. Where it is the local custom to pray the Rosary for the deceased person, this might be prayed after the Vigil. If the Vigil includes the reception of the body at the Church, then this ritual is not repeated at the beginning of the Funeral Liturgy. If the Vigil takes the form of the Office of the Dead it may be celebrated either as Morning Prayer (Lauds)  or Evening Prayer (Vespers).  This office should be sung whenever possible. The Liturgy of the Hours consists of three Psalms, a reading, intercessions, the Lord’s prayer and concluding prayer. According to local custom, the Rosary might follow this Office. If a viewing of the body...

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From the Rector: Funerals-Part II
Sep29

From the Rector: Funerals-Part II

Funerals: Part II of the Series In last week’s column we addressed the process of beginning the arrangements for the Funeral after the death of a loved one.  A very common question that often arises at this point is if the persons will be buried bodily, or if they will be cremated before burial, and what instruction the Church gives in regard to these questions. Questions about the presence of the body at the Funeral Mass It has always been the preference of the Church that the body of the deceased person be present at the Funeral Mass.  In fact, there is a different form of the Liturgy if the body is absent, and a slightly modified form if the cremated remains are present. There are several reasons for this tradition, the first and most important is the correspondence of our death to the death and burial of Our Lord Jesus.  He was taken down from the cross, and his body was laid in the tomb from which he rose again on Easter Morning.  In imitation of him we are placed in the grave, awaiting the day of the Resurrection. In times past, there was a concern on the part of the Church, when in certain cultures this correspondence was being called into question, or was being denied by the cremation of the body. In particular,  where there was an intention to scatter the ashes rather than to bury them, therefore, there was a very long period when Catholic burial was not granted to a person whose bodily remains were intentionally cremated.  Over time that tension has been resolved, and in our time, cremation is generally performed for economic  and not ideological considerations. In light of this development, the pastoral practice of the Church does permit the burial of the cremated remains now, however, there remains a preference for the cremation to take place after the funeral when possible. This is not an absolute requirement, but a preference.  What has not changed is the insistence that the cremated remains be treated with the same dignity as the bodily remains.  Namely, that the cremated remains are to be buried promptly in a grave or mausoleum and are not to be kept indefinitely or scattered. The ceremony for the interment of the cremated remains at the cemetery is virtually the same as for the body present in a casket.  The ground is blessed where the person is laid to rest, and therefore the grave becomes a sign of hope as the place from which our loved one will rise again from the dead when Jesus comes in Glory.  A grave site...

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