From the Rector: Marriage Preparation
Sep20

From the Rector: Marriage Preparation

Marriage Preparation: “On this journey [of marriage] prayer is important, it is necessary, always: he for her, she for him and both together. Ask Jesus to multiply your love. In the prayer of the Our Father we say: ‘Give us this day our daily bread’. Spouses can also learn to pray like this: ‘Lord, give us this day our daily love‘, for the daily love of spouses is bread, the true bread of the soul, what sustains them in going forward. This is the prayer for engaged couples and spouses. Teach us to love one another, to will good to the other! The more you trust in him, the more your love will be ‘forever’, able to be renewed, and it will conquer every difficulty.” Pope Francis – from an address on St. Valentine’s Day, Feb. 14, 2014 We would like to invite couples who are considering Marriage to contact the parish soon in order to begin the Sacramental preparation for Holy Matrimony.  If you are discerning the vocation to marriage the Classes will be offered in the months of October, November and December, every other Tuesday evening. Please do not make any definite arrangements before speaking with the parish. Marriage Sacramental preparation takes at least 6 months, but dates for next summer are already being arranged, so please don’t delay.   Our program consists of: FOCUS inventory interview Engaged Encounter retreat 6 instructional classes 1 liturgy planning meeting Wedding Rehearsal   Paperwork required: Pre-nuptial interview Sacramental records Marriage license Testimonial of Free Status   Engaged Encounter Weekend will be held on October 12-14, 2018 at Sacred Heart Retreat Center, Gallup, NM. This quiet weekend is specifically designed to give a couple planning marriage an opportunity to talk honestly and intensively about their future together.  Cost is $85.00 per couple which includes lodging, meals and all required materials.  For couples not requiring lodging the cost is $50.00 for meals and required materials. For more information contact Maria and Deacon Randy Copeland at 505-726-2707. To register go to www.engagedencountergallup.org....

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From the Rector: Letter from Bishop
Sep14

From the Rector: Letter from Bishop

In the bulletin this week is the statement regarding Archbishop Vigano from Bishop Wall which can be read below. Bishop’s Letter 9.16.18 Also this statement was released last week: On Wednesday, September 05, the Diocese of Gallup received an inquiry from New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas requesting documents and records from the Diocese of Gallup. We look forward to cooperating with the Attorney General to ensure the safety of all the members of our diocese. In order to be proactive in the protection of children, the Diocese of Gallup is also reaching out to other potential interested parties, such as the Arizona Attorney General, as the diocese is located in both Arizona and New Mexico. The Diocese of Gallup remains committed to the ongoing protection of children, transparency in these matters and to providing healing for survivors of sexual abuse. As Jesus Christ teaches, “There is nothing hidden that will not become visible, and nothing secret that will not be known and come to light” (Luke 8:17).   If anyone would like a copy of the letter or the statement you are welcomed to come by the parish office Monday-Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m....

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From the Rector: Good Shepherd
Sep06

From the Rector: Good Shepherd

The collection for the Priests’ Retirement Fund will be taken up  the weekend of September 15th and 16th.  The Catholic Diocese of Gallup is one of the neediest in the United States. We have no designated home for retired clergy, nor sufficient funds for their retirement. We need your help. Your generous contribution to the Priests’ Retirement Fund will help secure these priests in their old age. Throughout the month of September, we will have a Retirement Fund Campaign to raise funds for the Priests’ Retirement Fund. The Bishop’s letter is attached below: Good Shepherd...

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From the Rector
Aug30

From the Rector

As I mentioned last weekend, you will find the letter from Bishop Wall inserted in the bulletin this weekend. The Bishop’s office provided contact numbers for law enforcement agencies around the diocese that we have posted in the entrance of the Church along with the number of our own Victim’s assistance Coordinator.  Finally, the Bishop has asked us to pray the prayer to St. Michael the Archangel at the end of each Mass immediately following the final blessing and dismissal. St. Michael the Archangel Prayer St. Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle. Be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the Devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray, and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly hosts, by the power of God, thrust into hell Satan, and all the evil spirits, who prowl about the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen....

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From the Rector: From St John Paul II’s encyclical: Veritatis Splendor, August 6, 1993
Aug24

From the Rector: From St John Paul II’s encyclical: Veritatis Splendor, August 6, 1993

From St John Paul II’s encyclical: Veritatis Splendor, August 6, 1993 Mary, Mother of Mercy At the end of these considerations, let us entrust ourselves, the sufferings and the joys of our life, the moral life of believers and people of good will, and the research of moralists, to Mary, Mother of God and Mother of Mercy. Mary is Mother of Mercy because her Son, Jesus Christ, was sent by the Father as the revelation of God’s mercy (cf. Jn 3:16-18). Christ came not to condemn but to forgive, to show mercy (cf. Mt 9:13). And the greatest mercy of all is found in his being in our midst and calling us to meet him and to confess, with Peter, that he is “the Son of the living God” (Mt 16:16). No human sin can erase the mercy of God, or prevent him from unleashing all his triumphant power, if we only call upon him. Indeed, sin itself makes even more radiant the love of the Father who, in order to ransom a slave, sacrificed his Son:181 his mercy towards us is Redemption. This mercy reaches its fullness in the gift of the Spirit who bestows new life and demands that it be lived. No matter how many and great the obstacles put in his way by human frailty and sin, the Spirit, who renews the face of the earth (cf.Ps 104:30), makes possible the miracle of the perfect accomplishment of the good. This renewal, which gives the ability to do what is good, noble, beautiful, pleasing to God and in conformity with his will, is in some way the flowering of the gift of mercy, which offers liberation from the slavery of evil and gives the strength to sin no more. Through the gift of new life, Jesus makes us sharers in his love and leads us to the Father in the Spirit. Mary is also Mother of Mercy because it is to her that Jesus entrusts his Church and all humanity. At the foot of the Cross, when she accepts John as her son, when she asks, together with Christ, forgiveness from the Father for those who do not know what they do (cf. Lk 23:34), Mary experiences, in perfect docility to the Spirit, the richness and the universality of God’s love, which opens her heart and enables it to embrace the entire human race. Thus Mary becomes Mother of each and every one of us, the Mother who obtains for us divine mercy. Mary is the radiant sign and inviting model of the moral life. As Saint Ambrose put it, “The life of this one person can serve as...

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From the Rector: Part II
Aug15

From the Rector: Part II

Part II of Answer to Letter written in March 2016 5).  Doesn’t He rather mean that unless we appropriate to ourselves by faith the value of His death for us on Calvary, we can never be saved? It is true that the first part of the dialogue concerns faith.  But Jesus doesn’t stop there.  He tells us plainly that “the bread I will give is my flesh” (Jn 6:51).  When Jesus explains that the bread of life is literally His flesh, we must accept His clear words.  We cannot prefer a different explanation to the one Jesus Himself provides.  Believing in Jesus (the teaching of the first part of the discourse, verses 22-47) means believing that He will give us His actual flesh and blood to eat (the teaching of the second part v. 49-51). 6).  We must believe on Him, receive Him, trust Him, and make Him our very own. Amen!  All this we do by believing what He says about His Body and Blood, receiving Him in Holy Communion, trusting that He can accomplish what He promises, and making Him our very own in this precious gift. 7).  The disciples partook of the bread and wine, but they did not literally eat His flesh and drink His blood.   Compare your commentary to what the Scriptures state plainly. “While they were eating, Jesus took bread, said the blessing, broke it, and giving it to his disciples said, “Take and eat; this is my body.”  Then he took a cup, gave thanks, and gave it to them, saying, “Drink from it, all of you, for this is my blood of the covenant, which will be shed on behalf of many for the forgiveness of sins.” (Mt. 26:26-28). Jesus nowhere explains away the obvious meaning of His words.  The blood they drank is the same blood which would be shed for the forgiveness of sins the next day on Calvary.  If you were at the last supper, and heard Jesus say ‘this is my body, this is my blood’, would you have objected and said “no, Jesus, it is not your body and blood”? 8).  We don’t find the first century church celebrating Mass.   You are mistaken.  First of all, Jesus commanded them to do so when He said, “do this in remembrance of Me”(1 Cor11:24).  The passage you quoted from Acts of the Apostles actually shows that they were celebrating Mass, the “breaking of bread”(Acts 2:42) is precisely the Mass. 1Cor 10:16 says “The bread we break, is it not a participation in the Body of Christ?  St. Paul also wrote the first letter to the Corinthians to correct abuses that were cropping up at the celebration of the Lord’s Supper, which is another name for the celebration of...

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From the Rector: Answer to Letter-Part 1
Aug09

From the Rector: Answer to Letter-Part 1

March 27, 2006 Dear ______, Thank you for your letter.  This is a wonderful topic so I am happy to do my best to answer your questions.  It may take a while to answer all of them adequately.  What I ask is that you really consider the answers, and not to have your mind made up ahead of time.  You asked the following: 1).  If the wafer is turned into the body of Jesus, how come it still looks like a wafer and the wine still looks like wine? I could likewise ask you, if Jesus is really God, how come he looked like a man?  The answer is that God can be present in any way He wants to be.  Jesus, the Second Person of the Holy Trinity, joined a fully human nature to Himself. “Have this mind in you which was also in Christ Jesus, who though he was by nature God, did not consider being equal to God a thing to be clung to, but emptied himself, taking the nature of a slave being made like unto men.  And appearing in the form of a man, he humbled himself, becoming obedient to death, even to death on a cross.” (Phil 2:5-8). If God can appear in the form of Man, why is it impossible for him to appear under the form of Bread and Wine if He chooses to?  In the Eucharist He changes bread and wine into His Body and Blood.  Jesus is present in the Eucharist sacramentally, that is, in a hidden way.  He is the one who says it is so; “This is my body” (Mt 26:26).  “This is my blood”(Mt. 26:28). St. Paul says to the Corinthians: “Therefore whoever eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord unworthily, will have to answer for the body and blood of the Lord.  For any one who eats and drinks without discerning the body, eats and drinks judgment on himself.” (1Cor 11:27-29). Clearly St. Paul does not think the Eucharist is merely bread and wine, or only a symbol.  He warns of dire consequences for receiving unworthily.  Only if it is really His body and blood could someone have to answer for the body and blood.  He goes on to explain that because some of them don’t discern or recognize Christ’s Body in the Consecrated Bread  they eat and drink judgment on themselves, and as a consequence, many of them are ill, infirm, and a number of them were dying (see 1Cor 11:30). 2).  If we really ate Jesus’ flesh, isn’t that cannibalism? No.  Jesus gives us His Body and Blood sacramentally, under the appearances of bread and wine, precisely so that we...

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