From the Rector
Jan19

From the Rector

We have all, no doubt, witnessed the chronic condition in our community of substance abuse, homelessness, and the related lack of food and clothing resources. We would also like to be of some help in bringing relief, but don’t always know how. One of the little steps our parish has made in the past year was to establish an ongoing food collection. We directly distribute the food that is deposited in the entrance of the Cathedral Church, if there is an excess, we contribute it to the local food pantry. Most of us no doubt feel an inner conflict when we encounter the homeless when its connected to substance abuse. We are sometimes afraid that resources we give are enabling the dependance, and also sometimes simply just do not wish to encounter people who are not in a state to be gracious receivers of help we could give. There is of course no easy solution, or else it would have been accomplished long ago. I recently was given a good piece of advice from a person who does homeless ministry. He says that direct aid of money should probably not be given ordinarily. Rather, food, clothing  or other useful goods can be given. I would encourage you to make, and keep in your car a few little lunch sacks with non perishable items in them. What is always helpful is genuine human interaction! It is also always helpful to be able to make good referrals to agencies that are better equipped to deal with the material needs as well as resources for getting out of the circumstances that the people find themselves in. One thing you could and should always offer is prayer. Here are some local agencies that can provide help to people in need and in difficult situations. Catholic Charities 506 W. Hwy. 66 505-722-5272 Food, Clothing, Utilities Sheriff’s Department 300 B. Nizhoni Blvd. 505-863-1410 Gasoline Casa St. Joseph 411 West Wilson Ave. 505-721-5156 Food, Shelter (men and women) Care 66 407 W. Hwy. 66 505-722-0066 Shelter (men and women) Southwest Indian Foundation 100 W. Coal Ave. 505-863-2837 Assistance...

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From the Rector: The Lamb of God at Mass
Jan11

From the Rector: The Lamb of God at Mass

The Lamb of God at Mass During the breaking of the bread leading up to Communion at Mass, the Fraction Rite, the priest prays a short prayer as he places a small piece of the Consecrated Host into the chalice. While he does that we say or sing the Agnus Dei (AHG-noos DAY-ee) three times, the Lamb of God. Lamb of God is a name for Jesus that reminds us Jesus died for our sins. The priest genuflects and then makes this proclamation and joins us in the response. Behold the Lamb of God”. This is closer to the Latin, Ecce Agnus Dei (EH-chay AHG-noos DAY-ee), majestic in sound, this is a direct reference to John 1:29 where John the Baptist points out Jesus to his followers. The most basic description of what it means to be a Christian is that we believe Jesus Christ is both fully God, and fully Man; that he came for the sake of our salvation; and that we profess our faith in Him and accept Baptism for the forgiveness of sins.  John the Baptizer is one whose entire life was dedicated to that exact program. So when the assembly repeats his words, they are proclaiming what John proclaimed, that Jesus is the Lamb of God.  The priest takes the Sacred Body of Our Lord and holds it up either over the paten or the chalice, and declares the very words of John the Baptist, “Behold the Lamb of God, Behold Him who takes away the sins of the world. Blessed are those called to the supper of the Lamb.” Beati has been rendered “blessed.” You may be blessed even when you aren’t feeling so happy. This together with the direct reference to “the supper of the Lamb” makes clear the connection to Revelation 19:9. There, the angel in the vision has John write down the words that proclaim ‘blessed are all those called to the wedding feast of the Lamb.’ Our response, “Lord, I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof, but only say the word, and my soul shall be healed,” echoes the words of the Centurion, who asked Jesus to heal his servant in Luke 7:6-7 and Matthew 8:5-13. As we are presented with the very Body and Blood of Christ, we are called to the same, deep level of faith as the Centurion. While the priest receives communion following the Agnus Dei, we can prepare for communion by chanting the Communion Antiphon and silently making an Act of Faith: “Lord, I am about to receive you in the Eucharist; Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity. I believe this...

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From the Rector: Epiphany
Jan05

From the Rector: Epiphany

Epiphany On the feast of the Epiphany, when we reflect on the gifts given to the Baby Jesus by the Magi, it is fitting also to reflect upon our own gifts. We have all been given gifts beyond measure by God, who is the giver of all good things. Each of us have been given the gift of our Faith, which if responded to properly, will lead us through Jesus Christ to the rewards of heaven. Our very life is a gift. All the material and spiritual gifts we possess; from whom have we received them? Have we been grateful for them? How have we used them? How have we shared them? As the new year begins it is customary to make plans and resolutions. First among them should be how we will acknowledge, use and share the gifts we have received from God. I would like to suggest some ways in the parish that you might offer your time treasure and talent to the child Jesus. Things to which you might offer your time, talent and treasure. Choir  (Ruth Ruiz 505-906-2098) Linens   (Diane Courtois 505-722-6644) Ushers  (Frank Kozeliski 505-870-0316) Lectors  (Wade Bell 505-870-2130) Servers  (Eric Pena 505-870-9937) Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion  (Debra Kraus 505-870-2939) Bazaar   (Fr. Matthew Keller-Chair is Vacant) Knights of Columbus  (David Montoya) Decorating  (Sandra Esparza  & Jeanette Butler 505-979-2375) CCD   (Debra Trujillo 505-870-1785) Youth Group  (Leslie Farrell 505-722-6644) RCIA   (Nina Biava 505-979-0892) Sacred Heart School   (Linda Padilla 505-863-6652) Collection Counters  (Fr. Matthew Keller) Adopting Flower Pots   (Ray Casias) Altar society  Legion of Mary  (Maria Theresa Guillen 505-870-7560) 40 hours devotion  (This year June 6,7,8 ) Fiesta  (June 2, Fr. Keller) Visitation at Jail, Hospital, Nursing Homes.  (Fr. Cormack, Fr. Pio O’Conner) Jail/Prison Ministry (Sister Elizabeth Racko 928-606-4737) Bishop’s Annual Appeal  (Diocese of Gallup 505-863-4406) The Bishop’s Mardi Gras   (Catholic Peoples Foundation 505-726-8295) V8’s for Vocations  (Fr. Matthew Keller 505-722-6644) Pro-life Committee              (Sig Martinez 505-870-1703 Catholic Engaged Encounter (Deacon Randy & Maria Copeland 505-726-2707)...

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From the Rector: The Holy Family
Dec29

From the Rector: The Holy Family

The Holy Family The Feast of the Holy Family is not only about the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, but about our own families as well. The main purpose of the Feast is to Honor the Holy Family and present them as the model for all Christian families, and for domestic life in general. Our family life becomes sanctified when we live the life of the Church within our homes. This is called the “domestic church” or the “church in miniature.” St. John Chrysostom urged all Christians to make each home a “family church,” and in doing so, we sanctify the family unit. Just how does one live out the Church in the family? The best way is by making Christ the center of family and individual life. Ways to do this include: reading scripture regularly, praying daily, attending Mass at least on Sundays and Holy Days of Obligation, imitating the actions of the Holy Family, going to confession frequently, and so forth, all done together as a family unit. In addition to cultivating positive actions, the Church understands that various actions and behaviors are contrary to God’s Divine plan for the family. These include abortion, contraception, embryonic stem-cell research, divorce, spousal abuse, child abuse, among other things. Catholic Teaching is that a marriage must be open to children. Anything artificial that prevents this is contrary to divine law, although spacing births for a just reason is permitted (and may be accomplished through “natural family planning”). Also, poverty, lack of health care, rights violations, government intrusion in the life of communities and families, and other justice concerns must be addressed by faithful Christians because of the negative effect these conditions have on the family unit. St. Paul gives us some advice on family life in Colossians 3:12-21: Put on then, as God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved, compassion, kindness, lowliness, meekness, and patience, forbearing one another and, if one has a complaint against another, forgiving each other; as the Lord has forgiven you, so you also must forgive. And above all these put on love, which binds everything together in perfect harmony. And let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called in the one body. And be thankful. Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly, teach and admonish one another in all wisdom, and sing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs with thankfulness in your hearts to God. And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him. Wives, be subject to your...

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From the Rector: Merry Christmas
Dec19

From the Rector: Merry Christmas

As we approach the holy and joyful celebration of the birth of Our Lord Jesus, may your families share deeply in the saving mystery of His Life. I want to extend a warm welcome to all who are visiting or returning home to us during the holidays. Also, I am so grateful for everyone who participates in the life of our Cathedral parish! There are so many people who work to make this a place where God is worshipped and His people can come to experience His Love and Mercy. On Behalf of Bishop Wall, the Priests and Deacons, and all the staff of Sacred Heart Cathedral, we want to wish you and yours a Blessed, Holy, and Merry Christmas. In Christ the newborn King, -Fr. Keller...

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From the Rector: Third Sunday of Advent
Dec13

From the Rector: Third Sunday of Advent

Third Sunday of Advent The third Sunday of Advent is known as “Gaudete Sunday.” In the readings, we hear about miracles associated with the Messianic age, its coming, and what we need to do to prepare. We also learn about the doubts of John the Baptist, how he dealt with them, and the blessing that makes us even more fortunate than John was. Here are some things to know and share . . . 1) Why is the third Sunday of Advent known as Gaudete Sunday? Its name is taken from the entrance antiphon of the Mass, which is: Rejoice in the Lord always; again I say, rejoice. Indeed, the Lord is near. This is a quotation from Philippians 4:4-5, and in Latin, the first word of the antiphon is gaudete (Latin, “rejoice”; it’s also pronounced with three syllables: gau-de-te) 2) What significance does this have? Advent is the season of preparing for the arrival of the Lord Jesus (both his first coming and his second coming), and by the third Sunday of Advent, we are most of the way through the season. On Gaudete Sunday, the season of Advent shifts its focus. For the first two weeks of Advent, the focus can be summed up in the phrase, “The Lord is coming.” But beginning with Gaudete Sunday, the summary might be, “The Lord is near.” This shift is marked by a lighter mood, and a heightened sense of joyous anticipation. 3) What is the appropriate liturgical color for this day? According to the rubrics: In this mass the color violet or rose is used. It can thus be either one. It doesn’t have to be rose; it can also be violet. 4) How many candles are lit on the wreath? Three candles are lit this week, two purple and the one rose candle to signify the 3rd Sunday of Advent. 5) Is this the same as Laetare Sunday? Gaudete Sunday is often compared to  Laetare Sunday which  is the fourth Sunday in Lent. Like Gaudete Sunday, Laetare Sunday has a more light-hearted, celebratory mood relative to Lent’s usually strict mood....

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From the Rector: Origin and History of Advent
Dec07

From the Rector: Origin and History of Advent

Origin and History of Advent The exact time when the season of Advent came to be celebrated is not precisely known, the earliest evidence shows that the feast of the Nativity of Our Lord was established within the later part of the 4th century. There are homilies from the 5th century that discuss preparation in a general sense, but do not indicate an official liturgical season. A Synod held in 590 established that Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from November 11th until the Nativity would be offered according to the Lenten rite. This and other traditions, such as fasting, show that the period of time now established as the Advent season was more penitential (similar to Lent) than the liturgical season as we know it today. A collection of homilies from Pope St. Gregory the Great (whose papacy was from 590-604) included a sermon for the second Sunday of Advent, and by 650 Spain was celebrating the Sundays (five at the time) of Advent. So it seems the liturgical season was established around the latter part of the 6th century and first half of the 7th century. For the next couple of centuries, Advent was celebrated for five Sundays; Pope Gregory VII, who was pope from 1073-85, reduced the number to four Sundays. Advent Today The themes and traditions of the Advent season have evolved throughout the history of the liturgical season. As mentioned, the early Advent season was mainly penitential, close to the theme of the Lenten season. Today a penitential theme still exists, but it is not as intense as in 7th century. Also, it is blended with the theme of prayerful, spiritual preparation for the second and final coming of the Lord, as well as the joyful preparation for the annual festive remembrance of the Incarnation and Christ’s birth. Violet, or purple, is the appropriate vestment color, as noted in paragraph 346 of the General Instruction of the Roman Missal, in the section which discusses the prescribed colors for liturgical vestments: Violet or purple is used in Advent and Lent. It may also be worn in Offices and Masses for the Dead. Rose may be used, where it is the practice, on Gaudete Sunday (Third Sunday of Advent) and on Laetare Sunday (Fourth Sunday of Lent). Advent Traditions Advent celebration and traditions can vary from place to place, influenced by culture. However, some traditions have come to be common throughout the Catholic Church. The Advent wreath is likely the most popular tradition, and wreaths are typically present in both the parish church and in the home. It is often circular, representing God’s eternity, and it includes 4 candles – one for each Sunday of Advent. Many families have a wreath in the home, and will light the candles...

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