From the Rector: Temptation
Mar06

From the Rector: Temptation

In the Readings for this Sunday we hear about Jesus being tempted in the desert. Here are some insights to that trial derived from the Catechism and the writings of Pope Benedict XVI from an article in the National Catholic Register. Jesus’ first trial: forbidden food The first trial is occasioned by the fact Jesus has been fasting for forty days, and so he is hungry. The devil invites him to violate the fast by using his powers as the Son of God to turn a stone into bread. This echoes Adam eating the forbidden fruit and Israel’s complaint against Moses for depriving them of the bread they had in Egypt by leading them into the wilderness. In rebuffing the devil, Jesus repeats Moses’ rebuke to the Israelites’ complaint (Deut. 8:3). Jesus’ second trial: false worship In the second trial (in St. Luke’s order of presentation), the devil offers Jesus all the kingdoms of the world if he will worship him. This reflects the influence that the devil had in the world order of the time, but which he would lose through Jesus’ actions (Rev. 11:15). It asks Jesus to play into the false, political understanding of the Messiah’s role that was popular at the time, but which Jesus himself rejected (John 18:36). It also echoes the temptation to false worship that the Israelites had in the desert, both at the incident of the Golden Calf (Ex. 32:4) and more generally (Lev. 17:7). Jesus rebuffs the devil by quoting Deuteronomy 6:13, reflecting the fundamental requirement of Israelite worship. Jesus’ third trial: testing God In the third trial (in Luke’s order), the devil tries to get Jesus to put God to the test. Since Jesus has been rebuffing him by quoting Scripture, the devil now quotes a statement from the Psalms (Ps. 91:11-12) as the basis for the trial. In doing so, he inverts the meaning of the Psalm, which says that those who trust in God will receive his protection. It does not say that people should take reckless risks or insist on miracles on demand to test whether God will keep his word. That is an attitude of dis-trust. Jesus recognizes this and quotes back to him Deuteronomy 6:16, in which Moses rebukes the Israelites for having put God to the test in the wilderness. What does this event reveal to us about Jesus, Adam, and the devil? The Catechism of the Catholic Church states: The evangelists indicate the salvific meaning of this mysterious event: Jesus is the new Adam who remained faithful just where the first Adam had given in to temptation. Jesus fulfills Israel’s vocation perfectly: in contrast to those who had once provoked...

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From the Rector: O Sacrament Most Holy
Feb24

From the Rector: O Sacrament Most Holy

I have recently been asked a few times about the practice we have undertaken in the past year of repeating the devotional prayer to Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament after the recessional hymn at Mass. If you will recall, during the Jubilee year of Mercy, Bishop Wall asked us to begin on the Feast of Corpus Christi to recite 3 times the prayer: O Sacrament Most Holy, O Sacrament Divine, all praise and all thanksgiving be every moment Thine. The Bishop’s reason for this was drawn from the Eucharistic instructions of the Church in fostering a healthy respect and reverence toward Our Lord truly present, Body and Blood Soul and Divinity in the Most Blessed Sacrament of the Eucharist reserved in our Cathedral in the Tabernacle. I thought it would be a good idea to share with you the text of one of these Documents, EUCHARISTIAE SACRAMENTUM from the Sacred Congregation for Divine Worship. Relationship Between Eucharistic Worship Outside Mass And The Eucharistic Celebration The celebration of the eucharist is the center of the entire Christian life, both for the universal Church and for the local congregations of the Church. “The other sacraments, like every other ministry of the Church and every work of the apostolate, are linked with the holy eucharist and have it as their end. For the eucharist contains the Church’s entire spiritual wealth, that is, Christ himself. He is our Passover and living bread; through his flesh, made living and life-giving by the Holy Spirit, he is bringing life to people and in this way inviting and leading them to offer themselves together with him, as well as their labors and all created things.” “The celebration of the eucharist in the sacrifice of the Mass,” moreover, “is truly the origin and the purpose of the worship that is shown to the eucharist outside Mass.”Christ the Lord “is offered in the sacrifice of the Mass when he begins to be sacramentally present as the spiritual food of the faithful under the appearance of bread and wine”; “after the sacrifice has been offered . . . as long as the eucharist is reserved in churches and oratories, Christ is truly the Emmanuel, that is, ‘God with us.’ Day and night he is in our midst; full of grace and truth. he dwells among Us.” No one therefore may doubt “that all the faithful show this holy sacrament the veneration and adoration that is due to God himself, as has always been the practice recognized in the Catholic Church. Nor is the sacrament to be less the object of adoration on the grounds that it was instituted by...

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From the Rector: Flu Season
Feb17

From the Rector: Flu Season

It’s Flu time again. I received the following e-mail from a local medical doctor who gives us these updates periodically: Dear Father, It appears that the region is headed into the zenith of the flu season.  If it follows trends from prior years it will peak within the next month.  It also appears that our portion of the State leads in influenza incidence. https://nmhealth.org/data/view/infectious/1977/ In response to this warning, we will interrupt the regular distribution of Holy Communion under the form of the Precious Blood from the chalice at weekend Masses until we hear that the flu outbreak has passed. We are to remember that we always receive the whole Christ, Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity even when we receive Holy Communion under only one form. Has This Ever Happened to You? The ushers come forward to begin the Offertory collection process.  You lean over and ask your spouse if they have the envelope?  They reply that it was left on the table for you to put in your pocket.  Ooops!  No envelope to give this week!  In the rush of getting off to church, we all forget the envelope once in a while.  Check out an easier way to give. Sacred Heart Cathedral would like to thank the families who are currently giving electronically.  You may not see these fellow parishioners place an envelope in the basket every week, but their consistent giving does not go unnoticed in our parish office.  Each month our parish receives a steady and predictable stream of income from those donors who have made the commitment to give to God first by having a designated contribution automatically transferred to our parish through our Online Giving Program. If you would like to learn more about this easy, safe and secure way of giving, please contact our parish secretary or check out our website at  sacredheartgallup.org It’s simple!  It’s safe!  And it keeps God at the top of your giving list! Irish Prayer of Gratitude You’ve blessed me with friends, and laughter, and fun. With rain that’s as soft as the light of the sun. You’ve blessed me with stars to brighten each night. You’ve given me help to know wrong from right. You’ve given me so much. Please, Lord, give me too, a heart that is always grateful to you....

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From the Rector: Church’s Sacristy
Feb09

From the Rector: Church’s Sacristy

A church’s sacristy might seem to be a place of mystery to many Catholics. Relatively few have reason to venture into a sacristy, and those who do generally have a purpose in mind, usually talking to the priest. Indeed, the sacristy is typically the domain of the altar servers, sacristans, and those in charge of laundering the altar linens. Let’s take a look around and see what’s typically in there. The accompanying diagram from Fr. William O’Brien’s book, In Sacristy and Sanctuary, depicts many of the [numbered] key objects found in a typical sacristy: 1) The sink, not to be confused with 3) the sacrárium, a special sink which drains into the ground rather than the sewer. The sacrárium is used to dispose of Holy Water, water in which dropped Hosts have been dissolved, and in general any liquid which has been blessed. 2) The sacristy table contains drawers for altar linens, certain types of vestments and vestment parts (stoles, maniples) that can be stored flat, and supplies of all sorts. Older churches may have one or more framed prayer cards above the table, containing Vesting Prayers and Prayers Before and After Mass. Above the sink in older churches is often found the Prayer Before Washing Hands. These prayers are sometimes in Latin and are said by the celebrant while vesting before Mass. In newer churches they are provided on portable, framed cards. 5) The incense cabinet, containing the thurible, charcoal, incense, matches, the incense boat, and related supplies. 6) The safe, containing the cibória (containers for the Hosts), chalices, monstrance, reliquaries, and related precious metallic objects. Vestments and altar servers’ cassocks and surplices are stored in closets, sometimes in a separate sacristy room on the other side of the sanctuary (the “servers sacristy”, meant for servers, as opposed to the main “priest’s sacristy”). There is always a Crucifix in the sacristy, meant as a focal point for prayer. Before Mass, the servers and celebrant all face the Crucifix while the priest says, “Procedámus in pace.” [Let us go in peace], to which the servers respond, “In Nómine Christi. Amen.” [In the Name of Christ. Amen.] After Mass, all bow to the Crucifix and the celebrant says “Pro sit” [Let it be ], then the servers respond saying, “Pro Omnibus et singulis.” [For all, and for each one .]...

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From the Rector: Holy Matrimony: Questions and Answers
Feb03

From the Rector: Holy Matrimony: Questions and Answers

Holy Matrimony: Questions and Answers We’ve been preparing a lot of Couples for Holy Matrimony!  There are always a lot of good questions that people hope to find answers to.  Here is a sample of the Questions and Answers prepared by the Catholic Bishops on their website http://www.foryourmarriage.org Q: If a Catholic wants to marry a non-Catholic, how can they assure that the marriage is recognized by the Church? In addition to meeting the criteria for a valid Catholic marriage, the Catholic must seek permission from the local bishop to marry a non-Catholic. If the person is a non-Catholic Christian, this permission is called a “permission to enter into a mixed marriage.” If the person is a non-Christian, the permission is called a “dispensation from disparity of cult.” Those helping to prepare the couple for marriage can assist with the permission process. Q: If two Catholics or a Catholic and non-Catholic are married invalidly in the eyes of the church, what should they do about it? They should approach their pastor to try to resolve the situation. Q: When a Catholic marries a non-Catholic, must the non-Catholic promise to raise the children in the Catholic faith? The non-Catholic spouse does not have to promise to have the children raised Catholic. The Catholic spouse must promise to do all that he or she can to have the children baptized and raised in the Catholic faith. Q: What should a couple do when they decide that they want to marry in the Catholic Church? They should contact their parish as soon as possible and make an appointment to talk with the priest, deacon or staff person who is responsible for preparing couples for marriage. This person will explain the process of marriage preparation and the various programs that are offered. Q: Why does the church require engaged couples to participate in a marriage preparation program? Marriage preparation offers couples the opportunity to develop a better understanding of Christian marriage; to evaluate and deepen their readiness to live married life; and to gain insights into themselves as individuals and as a couple. It is especially effective in helping couples to deal with the challenges of the early years of marriage. Q: If a marriage is annulled are the children from it considered illegitimate? No. A declaration of nullity has no effect on the legitimacy of children, since the child’s mother and father were presumed to be married at the time that the child was born. Q: How can a couple married 20 years get an annulment? The annulment process examines the events leading up to, and at the time of, the wedding ceremony,...

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From the Rector
Jan27

From the Rector

I recently had a conversation with someone concerning the role of God’s Providence in our lives. The Conversation led to us looking up some definitions in Church documents of exactly what is meant by God’s Divine Providence: PROVIDENCE: God’s all-wise plan for the universe, and the carrying out of his plan by his loving rule or governance. The eternal world plan and its fulfillment in time are together called divine providence. As expressed by the First Vatican Council (1869-1870), “God in His providence watches over and governs all the things that He made, reaching from end to end with might and disposing all things with gentleness” (Denzinger 3003). Divine providence is universal in that all events, even the most personal decisions of human beings, are part of god’s eternal plan. It is infallibly certain because the ultimate purpose that God has for the universe will not fail. And it is immutable because God himself cannot change. (Etym. Latin providentia, foresight, foreknowledge.) Creation’s Destiny (Catechism #302-305) God did not make creation “complete from the beginning,” but willed “a state of journeying.” God always guides all creation toward its ultimate perfection by Divine Providence. “By his providence God protects and governs all things which he has made” (First Vatican Council). God’s care for every creature (from least to greatest) is concrete and immediate. God does “whatever he pleases” (Ps 115:3). Christ opens and no one shuts, shuts and no one opens” (Rev 3:7). “The purpose of the Lord will be established” (Prov 19:21). Scripture, in attributing actions to God without mentioning any other causes, is not using a “primitive mode of speech” but is professing a faith in God’s lordship over all history. Jesus tells us not to be anxious: “Your heavenly Father knows what you need. Seek first his kingdom and all these things shall be yours as well” (Mt 6:31-33). Inviting Us to Cooperate (Catechism #306-308) God uses our cooperation. In his goodness, He gives us our existence and by our free will the opportunity to cooperate in his plan. God even invites us to “subdue the earth and have dominion over it (Gen 1:26-28). He invites us to complete his work of creation. As knowing collaborators, we are “God’s fellow workers” (1Cor 3:9). We believe that God, the Creator (the first Cause) is always at work in us (the second cause). “For God is at work in you” (Phil 2:13). We can do nothing without God, especially gain eternal life. “Without a Creator, the creature vanishes” (Second Vatican Council). We might do well to take to heart the famous saying of St. Padre Pio, “Pray, hope, don’t worry!”...

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From the Rector: Helping Those in Need
Jan20

From the Rector: Helping Those in Need

Helping Those in Need We have all, no doubt, witnessed the chronic condition in our community of substance abuse, homelessness, and the related lack of food and clothing resources.  We would also like to be of some help in bringing relief, but don’t always know how.  One of the little steps our parish has made in the past year was to establish an ongoing food collection.  We directly distribute the food that is deposited in the entrance of the Cathedral Church, if there is an excess, we contribute it to the local food pantry. Most of us no doubt feel an inner conflict when we encounter the homeless when its connected to substance abuse. We are sometimes afraid that resources we give are enabling the dependance, and also sometimes simply just do not wish to encounter people who are not in a state to be gracious receivers of help we could give.  There is of course no easy solution, or else it would have been accomplished long ago. I recently was given a good piece of advice from a person who does homeless ministry.  He says that direct aid of money should probably not be given ordinarily.  Rather, food, clothing  or other useful goods can be given. I would encourage you to make, and keep in your car a few little lunch sacks with non perishable items in them.  What is always helpful is genuine human interaction!  It is also always helpful to be able to make good referrals to agencies that are better equipped to deal with the material needs as well as resources for getting out of the circumstances that the people find themselves in.  One thing you could and should always offer is prayer. Here are some local agencies that can provide help to people in need and in difficult situations. Catholic Charities: 505-722-5272, 506 West Highway 66—Food, Clothing and Utilities Sheriff’s Department: 505-863-1410, 300 B Nizhoni Blvd.—Gasoline Casa St. Joseph: 505-721-5156, 411 West Wilson Ave. —Food and Shelter (Men and Women) Care 66: 505-722-0066, 407 West Highway 66– Shelter (Men and Women) Shelter for those trying to break the use of drugs and alcohol call 505-728-8477 If you know of any other resource please let the parish office know, we will add it to our list....

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