Holy Day of Obligation: Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Aug10

Holy Day of Obligation: Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary— Holy Day of Obligation Wednesday, August 15, 2018 The Mass schedule is as follows: Tuesday, August 14th – Vigil Mass 5:15 pm Wednesday, August 15th – 6:30 am 8:00 am 7:00 pm Blessed Virgin Mary Pray for Us!  

Read More
Sunday School: Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Aug09

Sunday School: Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Sunday School To print or view the Sunday School page, click on the link below: Sunday School-Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time Cycly...

Read More
From the Rector: Answer to Letter-Part 1
Aug09

From the Rector: Answer to Letter-Part 1

March 27, 2006 Dear ______, Thank you for your letter.  This is a wonderful topic so I am happy to do my best to answer your questions.  It may take a while to answer all of them adequately.  What I ask is that you really consider the answers, and not to have your mind made up ahead of time.  You asked the following: 1).  If the wafer is turned into the body of Jesus, how come it still looks like a wafer and the wine still looks like wine? I could likewise ask you, if Jesus is really God, how come he looked like a man?  The answer is that God can be present in any way He wants to be.  Jesus, the Second Person of the Holy Trinity, joined a fully human nature to Himself. “Have this mind in you which was also in Christ Jesus, who though he was by nature God, did not consider being equal to God a thing to be clung to, but emptied himself, taking the nature of a slave being made like unto men.  And appearing in the form of a man, he humbled himself, becoming obedient to death, even to death on a cross.” (Phil 2:5-8). If God can appear in the form of Man, why is it impossible for him to appear under the form of Bread and Wine if He chooses to?  In the Eucharist He changes bread and wine into His Body and Blood.  Jesus is present in the Eucharist sacramentally, that is, in a hidden way.  He is the one who says it is so; “This is my body” (Mt 26:26).  “This is my blood”(Mt. 26:28). St. Paul says to the Corinthians: “Therefore whoever eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord unworthily, will have to answer for the body and blood of the Lord.  For any one who eats and drinks without discerning the body, eats and drinks judgment on himself.” (1Cor 11:27-29). Clearly St. Paul does not think the Eucharist is merely bread and wine, or only a symbol.  He warns of dire consequences for receiving unworthily.  Only if it is really His body and blood could someone have to answer for the body and blood.  He goes on to explain that because some of them don’t discern or recognize Christ’s Body in the Consecrated Bread  they eat and drink judgment on themselves, and as a consequence, many of them are ill, infirm, and a number of them were dying (see 1Cor 11:30). 2).  If we really ate Jesus’ flesh, isn’t that cannibalism? No.  Jesus gives us His Body and Blood sacramentally, under the appearances of bread and wine, precisely so that we...

Read More
Sunday School: Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Aug09

Sunday School: Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Sunday School To print or view the Sunday School page, click on the link below: Sunday School-Eighteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time Cycle...

Read More
From the Rector: Sacred Heart Bazaar
Aug09

From the Rector: Sacred Heart Bazaar

Sacred Heart Annual Bazaar We are beginning to plan for the annual fall Bazaar fundraiser which will take place on Sunday November 4, 2018 at the Sacred Heart School gym. As in past years this event has been a community building, family fun filled day that supports our parish financially. Our custom is to have a Turkey Dinner, booths, games, and activities. In past years there have been couples, families, committees, and individuals who have spearheaded the effort. The first organizational meeting will take place on Tuesday evening August 14th at 7pm in the Family Center.  If you have ideas, suggestions, and the ability to pitch in, we need help on every level of organization, planning, volunteering, working, help soliciting for sponsors and donations. Please don’t keep your lamp under a bushel basket! Come join in to make this year’s Bazaar a great success....

Read More
Sunday School: Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Jul27

Sunday School: Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Sunday School To print or view the Sunday School page, click on the link below: Sunday School-Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time Cycle...

Read More
From the Rector: Can We Please Pursue Spiritual Excellence At Least as Hard as We Do for Sports and Academics?
Jul27

From the Rector: Can We Please Pursue Spiritual Excellence At Least as Hard as We Do for Sports and Academics?

Can We Please Pursue Spiritual Excellence At Least as Hard as We Do for Sports and Academics? Fr. Bill Peckman – July 21, 2018 Anything we deem as important, we usually will try to master. You see this with athletes. They will alter exercise routines, nourishment, and upend their schedule to grow better at a sport. You see this with gamers. They will spend inordinate amounts of time and energy to up their skill level to get better. You see this with craftsmen. They will dig down and learn techniques that help them master their trade. You see this with serious scholars who will spend hour upon hour learning, studying, and expanding their understanding. You see this with body builders who will get meticulous about nutrition, exercise, and spend long hours in the gym to sculpt what they deem to be the perfect body. These all take dedication and a willingness to sacrifice and suffer for whatever they deem worthy of that time and energy. It is true for physical pursuits. It is true for intellectual pursuits. Here is a fact: it is also true spiritual pursuits. While God gives us grace, the pursuit of holiness is not easy. Like matters of the body and soul, it requires discipline, time, energy, and a willingness to sacrifice and suffer to grow stronger. Here is another fact, a rather sobering one: the athlete and bodybuilder end up dying just like anyone else. So does the gamer, the scholar, and the craftsmen. Don’t let these pursuits become so primary that you ignore the only thing that lasts: your soul. We allow the pursuit of the temporary crowd out the pursuit of the eternal. We believe we can regulate the eternal as a matter of convenience that will be attended to once activities we deem more important are sated. This is short sighted. We teach our children what is more important and worthy of their time. This is not an either/or proposition. One can be a great athlete, scholar, or craftsmen without neglecting their soul. It is about priority and discipline. Think about this when the choice between sports and faith come up. Think about this when you cede ground on Sundays to yet more worldly activities. Balance. That is what I am proposing. To quote Christ, “What good is it for someone to gain the whole world, yet forfeit their soul?” (Mark 8.36)...

Read More