Sunday School: Twenty-Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Sep15

Sunday School: Twenty-Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Sunday School To print or view the Sunday School page, click on the link below: Sunday School 24th Sunday in Ordinary Time Cycle A...

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From the Rector: Keeping Sunday-All Day
Sep15

From the Rector: Keeping Sunday-All Day

KEEPING SUNDAY—ALL DAY Celebrating the Sunday Eucharist—though central and essential—does not complete our observance of Sunday. In addition to attending Mass each Sunday, we should also refrain “from those activities which impede the worship of God and disturb the joy proper to the day of the Lord or the necessary relaxation of mind and body” (Compendium of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, no. 453). Sunday has traditionally been a day of rest. However, the concept of a day of rest may seem odd in a world that runs 24/7, where we are tethered to our jobs by a variety of electronic gadgets, where businesses run as normal no matter what the day of the week, and where silence seems to be an endangered species. By taking a day each week to rest in the Lord, we provide a living example to the culture that all time belongs to God and that people are more important than things. As Pope John Paul II said in Dies Domini (The Day of the Lord), his apostolic letter on Sunday: Through Sunday rest, daily concerns and tasks can find their proper perspective: the material things about which we worry give way to spiritual values; in a moment of encounter and less pressured exchange, we see the true face of the people with whom we live. Even the beauties of nature—too often marred by the desire to exploit, which turns against man him- self—can be rediscovered and enjoyed to the full. (Dies Domini, no. 67) Not everyone has the freedom to take Sundays away from work. Some people, including medical professionals and public safety workers, must work on Sundays to keep the rest of us safe and healthy. Others must work for economic reasons beyond their control. Resting on Sunday does not mean that we are inactive. Instead, Sunday is traditionally consecrated by Christian piety to good works and humble service of the sick, the infirm, and the elderly. Christians will also sanctify Sunday by devoting time and care to their families and relatives, often difficult to do on other days of the week. Sunday is a time for reflection, silence, cultivation of the mind, and meditation which furthers the growth of the Christian interior life. (CCC, no. 2186) To celebrate the Lord’s Day more fully, consider trying the following: ✠ Don’t use Sunday as your catch-all day for errands and household chores. ✠ Share a family dinner after Mass. Have the whole family join in the preparation and cleanup. ✠ Go for a walk or bike ride and give thanks to God for the beauty of nature. ✠ Spend time reading the Bible or a spiritual book. ✠ Pray the...

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Sunday School: Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time
Sep08

Sunday School: Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

Sunday School To print or view the Sunday School page, click on the link below: Sunday School 23rd Sunday in Ordinary Time Cycle A  ...

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From the Rector: A Plan of Life: Part II
Sep08

From the Rector: A Plan of Life: Part II

A Plan of Life: Part II The weekly plan: In the course of the week, designate one day in which to emphasize each one of the pillars. On that day include an item from a particular category that might not be done as frequently: Examples: Spiritual formation day: A special day for fasting, lectoring or serving a at a weekday Mass. Human formation day: A once a week choir practice; an extended hike; House cleaning day. Intellectual formation day: A once a week class or conference. Pastoral formation day: A Special visit to nursing home or teaching a CCD class. The weekly plan takes into consideration absolute essentials like Sunday Mass. The Monthly Plan: The monthly plan reminds one not to neglect certain practices that should engage in at least monthly. Examples: Spiritual formation: Spiritual direction and Confession. Human Formation: Letters, calls or visits to family members, Bookkeeping. Intellectual Formation: Finishing a book that has been lingering. Pastoral Formation: Pro- Life activities, promoting vocations. The yearly plan: This plan is used to set goals for the coming year and evaluate the past year. It also reminds us about special days we should plan for throughout the year. Examples: Spiritual Formation: Plan an annual retreat, Celebrate the Anniversary of one’s Baptism Day. Human Formation: Plan when and how to spend Vacation time; plan to learn more chant. Intellectual Formation: Commit to learning improving language skills in the coming year. Plan to contribute an article to the diocesan paper, or to learn a new language. Pastoral Formation: Decide which apostolate will be undertaken in the following year....

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Sunday School: Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time
Aug31

Sunday School: Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time

Sunday School To print or view the Sunday School page, click on the link below: Sunday School 22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time Cycle...

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From the Rector: A Plan of Life-Part I
Aug31

From the Rector: A Plan of Life-Part I

A Plan of Life: Part I Why a plan of life? A personal plan of life is a way of keeping the various aspects of one’s life and formation in balance.   There are certain advantages to following a plan of life: -A plan gives constancy and regularity to one’s efforts in developing and deepening the spiritual life. -With a plan, there is less danger of being lazy and of wasting time. -With a plan one is less likely to fall away from spiritual practices. -A plan of life causes one to be attentive to the duty of the moment. -With a plan it is easier to see God in the ordinary activities of the Day. (adapted from Arlington Diocese QV days)   Without a plan: (adapted from Arlington Diocese QV days) -one’s progress may suffer. -one might altogether neglect some important aspects of formation. -one might suffer from indecision about what to do. -one might neglect his duties. -we might move too hastily or too slowly from one thing to the next.   How to develop a plan of life. The Daily plan: Using the four pillars of formation, Select the elements from each area which ought to be done daily if at all possible. Categorize the things you already do in the course of the day including your duties. If you are a student, you are already doing a lot of intellectual formation! Try to plan out a time and place for accomplishing as many of these as is feasible. If it is not practical to accomplish all of the items in a category, cut down some aspects from different areas but do not completely eliminate any one of the four areas or any absolutely necessary item. Spiritual Formation Human Formation Intellectual Formation Pastoral Formation -Morning Offering -Exercise -Study -The Spiritual and Corporal works of mercy -Daily Examen -Recreation -Library research -Some form of penance or mortification -Daily Mass -Service -Discussion   -The Liturgy of the hours (some part) -Fraternity -Reading   -A holy hour (some time of prayer and adoration) -Daily Duties     -Meditation       -The Rosary       Try to keep a balance. Vary the items in the daily plan throughout the week to try to cover a wider range so that nothing is altogether left out. Saturday for example is traditionally a day of devotion to Our Lady, Thursday is the day of devotion to Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament, and Friday a day of devotion to penance....

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Sunday School: Twenty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time
Aug25

Sunday School: Twenty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time

Sunday School To print or view the Sunday School page, click on the link below: Sunday School 21st Sunday in Ordinary Time Cycle A...

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