Sunday School: Third Sunday of Advent
Dec13

Sunday School: Third Sunday of Advent

Sunday School To print or view the Sunday School page, click on the link below: Sunday School-Third Sunday of Advent Cycle B

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From the Rector: Third Sunday of Advent
Dec13

From the Rector: Third Sunday of Advent

Third Sunday of Advent The third Sunday of Advent is known as “Gaudete Sunday.” In the readings, we hear about miracles associated with the Messianic age, its coming, and what we need to do to prepare. We also learn about the doubts of John the Baptist, how he dealt with them, and the blessing that makes us even more fortunate than John was. Here are some things to know and share . . . 1) Why is the third Sunday of Advent known as Gaudete Sunday? Its name is taken from the entrance antiphon of the Mass, which is: Rejoice in the Lord always; again I say, rejoice. Indeed, the Lord is near. This is a quotation from Philippians 4:4-5, and in Latin, the first word of the antiphon is gaudete (Latin, “rejoice”; it’s also pronounced with three syllables: gau-de-te) 2) What significance does this have? Advent is the season of preparing for the arrival of the Lord Jesus (both his first coming and his second coming), and by the third Sunday of Advent, we are most of the way through the season. On Gaudete Sunday, the season of Advent shifts its focus. For the first two weeks of Advent, the focus can be summed up in the phrase, “The Lord is coming.” But beginning with Gaudete Sunday, the summary might be, “The Lord is near.” This shift is marked by a lighter mood, and a heightened sense of joyous anticipation. 3) What is the appropriate liturgical color for this day? According to the rubrics: In this mass the color violet or rose is used. It can thus be either one. It doesn’t have to be rose; it can also be violet. 4) How many candles are lit on the wreath? Three candles are lit this week, two purple and the one rose candle to signify the 3rd Sunday of Advent. 5) Is this the same as Laetare Sunday? Gaudete Sunday is often compared to  Laetare Sunday which  is the fourth Sunday in Lent. Like Gaudete Sunday, Laetare Sunday has a more light-hearted, celebratory mood relative to Lent’s usually strict mood....

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Sacred Heart Cathedral’s Christmas and New Year’s Mass Schedule
Dec12

Sacred Heart Cathedral’s Christmas and New Year’s Mass Schedule

The Nativity of our Lord Jesus Christ Christmas Eve, December 24th 8:00 a.m.—Sunday Mass 11:00 a.m.—Sunday Mass 5:15 p.m.—Christmas Vigil Mass (Family Mass) 11:00 p.m.-12:00 a.m.—Confessions 11:30 p.m.-12:00 a.m.—Christmas Caroling   Christmas Day, December 25th 12:00 a.m.—Midnight Mass 8:00 a.m.—Christmas Day Mass 11:00 a.m.—Christmas Day Mass   New Year’s Eve, December 31st 8:00 a.m.— Sunday Mass 11:00 a.m.—Sunday Mass   Solemnity of Mary the Mother of God (Not a Holy Day of Obligation) New Year’ Day, January 1st 6:30 a.m.—Mass 8:00...

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Sunday School: Second Sunday of Advent
Dec07

Sunday School: Second Sunday of Advent

Sunday School To print or view the Sunday School page, click on the link below: Sunday School-Second Sunday of Advent Cycle B

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From the Rector: Origin and History of Advent
Dec07

From the Rector: Origin and History of Advent

Origin and History of Advent The exact time when the season of Advent came to be celebrated is not precisely known, the earliest evidence shows that the feast of the Nativity of Our Lord was established within the later part of the 4th century. There are homilies from the 5th century that discuss preparation in a general sense, but do not indicate an official liturgical season. A Synod held in 590 established that Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from November 11th until the Nativity would be offered according to the Lenten rite. This and other traditions, such as fasting, show that the period of time now established as the Advent season was more penitential (similar to Lent) than the liturgical season as we know it today. A collection of homilies from Pope St. Gregory the Great (whose papacy was from 590-604) included a sermon for the second Sunday of Advent, and by 650 Spain was celebrating the Sundays (five at the time) of Advent. So it seems the liturgical season was established around the latter part of the 6th century and first half of the 7th century. For the next couple of centuries, Advent was celebrated for five Sundays; Pope Gregory VII, who was pope from 1073-85, reduced the number to four Sundays. Advent Today The themes and traditions of the Advent season have evolved throughout the history of the liturgical season. As mentioned, the early Advent season was mainly penitential, close to the theme of the Lenten season. Today a penitential theme still exists, but it is not as intense as in 7th century. Also, it is blended with the theme of prayerful, spiritual preparation for the second and final coming of the Lord, as well as the joyful preparation for the annual festive remembrance of the Incarnation and Christ’s birth. Violet, or purple, is the appropriate vestment color, as noted in paragraph 346 of the General Instruction of the Roman Missal, in the section which discusses the prescribed colors for liturgical vestments: Violet or purple is used in Advent and Lent. It may also be worn in Offices and Masses for the Dead. Rose may be used, where it is the practice, on Gaudete Sunday (Third Sunday of Advent) and on Laetare Sunday (Fourth Sunday of Lent). Advent Traditions Advent celebration and traditions can vary from place to place, influenced by culture. However, some traditions have come to be common throughout the Catholic Church. The Advent wreath is likely the most popular tradition, and wreaths are typically present in both the parish church and in the home. It is often circular, representing God’s eternity, and it includes 4 candles – one for each Sunday of Advent. Many families have a wreath in the home, and will light the candles...

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Sunday School: First Sunday of Advent
Dec01

Sunday School: First Sunday of Advent

Sunday School To print or view the Sunday School page, click on the link below: Sunday School-First Sunday of Advent Cycle B

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From the Rector: The meaning of the Advent wreath and candles
Dec01

From the Rector: The meaning of the Advent wreath and candles

The meaning of the Advent wreath and candles. Darkness and Light The Advent candles readily demonstrate the strong contrast between darkness and light. In the Bible, Christ is referred to as the “Light of the World” contrasted with the darkness of sin. Human history spanned long ages before our prophesied Savior would finally make his appearance, and God’s promise to make all things new through him. As his Advent, or “coming,” draws nearer another candle is lit, with each candle dispelling the darkness a little more. Thus, the Advent wreath helps us to spiritually contemplate the great drama of salvation history that surrounds the birth of God Incarnate who comes to redeem the human race. The Four Weeks of Advent During the first two weeks of Advent we light the first two purple candles. The Third Sunday of Advent is called Gaudete (Rejoice) Sunday. On this day we celebrate that our waiting for the birth of Jesus on Christmas day is almost over. Rose is a liturgical color that is used to signify joy, so we light the single pink candle on the third Sunday of Advent. Then on the fourth Sunday of Advent, the final purple candle is lit to mark the final week of prayer and penance as we wait expectantly for the soon-coming birth of the King of Kings. Traditionally, each of the four Advent candles have a deeper meaning The 1st Sunday of Advent symbolizes Hope with the “Prophet’s Candle” reminding us that Jesus is coming. The 2nd Sunday of Advent symbolizes Faith with the “Bethlehem Candle” reminding us of Mary and Joseph’s journey to Bethlehem. The 3rd Sunday of Advent symbolizes Joy with the “Shepherd’s Candle” reminding us of the Joy the world experienced at the coming birth of Jesus. The 4th Sunday of Advent symbolizes Peace with the “Angel’s Candle” reminding us of the message of the angels: “Peace on Earth, Good Will Toward Men.” Color Violet is a liturgical color that is used to signify a time of prayer, penance, and sacrifice and is used during Advent and Lent.  Advent, also called “little Lent,” is the season where we spiritually wait in our “darkness” with hopeful expectation for our promised redemption, just as the whole world did before Christ’s birth, and just as the whole world does now as we eagerly await his promised return....

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